Centers & Research Groups

Medieval/Renaissance Colloquium

med-ren image 091313 Medieval/Renaissance Colloquium
Research Group

Coordinators
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The Medieval-Renaissance Colloquium was founded by the Graduate English Department at Rutgers to bring together an intellectual community of students and scholars working within the Medieval and Renaissance periods. We offer various events throughout the year - from workshopping dissertation articles, to hosting critically acclaimed guest speakers, to putting on a full symposium each Spring - in order to generate a lively discussion about the literary, historical, and cultural works from these periods and to offer a congenial environment in which scholars can exchange ideas.

2013-2014 Events
Date Event
   
October 29, 2013 Open Class "Medieval Autobiography" with Guest Speaker Fiona Griffiths.
Professor Stacy Klein will be bringing scholar Fiona Griffiths to Rutgers to speak with her seminar group about the medieval Letters of Abelard and Heloise, and has opened the class to any graduate student who wishes to attend. The discussion will focus on ideas of self and identity in connection with this deeply personal text.
   
November 8, 2013 Digital Humanities / Early Modern Texts, featuring Daniel Shore, Scott Trudell, and Elliott Visconsi
   
November 13, 2013 Article Workshop with Erin Kelly (w/ pizza dinner)
   
November 21, 2013 Article Workshop with April Graham (w/ pizza dinner)
   
December 3, 2013 Article Workshop with Brian Pietras (w/ pizza dinner)
   
December 6, 2013 Machiavelli at Rutgers CCA, featuring Jeff Rufo and Andras Kisery
   
January 29, 2014 Article Workshop with Stephanie Hunt (w/ pizza dinner)
   
February 18, 2014 Guest Speaker Mary Morse (followed by a reception)Following the recent publication of her ground-breaking research on birth girdles, a manuscript worn as a kind of amulet to protect women against the dangers of childbirth, medieval scholar Mary Morse will be coming to Rutgers to share her findings, which have striking implications for what we thought we knew about the way texts were perceived and utilized in the Middle Ages and even into the Renaissance.