354:202 Introduction to Film II

01 MW6 LIV 04038 MARTIN-MARQUEZ TIL-116
M 7,8 FILM SCREENING TIL-116

02 TTH4 CAC 20602 FLITTERMAN-LEWIS MI-100
T 7,8 FILM SCREENING MI-100

01-This course presents students to some of the major modes and styles of fiction and non-fiction filmmaking, inside and outside of Hollywood. We will begin with an intensive introduction to Hollywood classical filmmaking and close textual analysis: mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing and sound. This will be followed by an exploration of genre and its permutations within different cultural contexts (looking at specific examples of, for example, melodrama, the musical, and the Western). We will then explore alternatives to classical narrative filmmaking from the New Cinemas and Counter Cinema movements of the 1960s and beyond. In the last part of the semester we will consider (mostly) non-fiction filmmaking: documentary/mockumentary and experimental/avant-garde works. In addition to the U.S., films will likely be drawn from Mexico, India, France, Cuba, Senegal, Yugoslavia, Brazil, and Iran.

02-This second half of the Introductory course focuses on the major modes of fiction and non-fiction cinema, using these films as a point of departure for discussing theoretical/critical issues of genre, authorship, realism, avant-garde, and documentary. We will begin with the Classical Hollywood Cinema, first in its earliest form, then move to the studio system (Ford, Hawks, Hitchcock) in order to see how the basic elements of film language--mise en scene, cinematography, editing, and sound--are deployed by these directors to contribute to a notion of the Hollywood product as something more than entertainment, as artistic expression. We will then discuss various alternative types of filmmaking, from non- or anti- narrative, to documentary, and experimental films, in an effort to understand the cinema as both a language system and as an institution.