200 Level Courses in English

358:206 How to Find an Internship

01   MTH3    CAC   18074   KEATES   HH-A3 This minicourse is part of a new internship initiative in the English Department. While it is designed specifically for English majors and minors, students from other departments across the humanities are encouraged to enroll. The goal of the class is to help you discover the full range of career options available to you, and to assist you in locating internships to get the experience needed to land these jobs upon graduation. The course will help you learn how to...

358:206 Introduction to Literary Studies

02  TF3   CAC   18074   PIWINSKI  SC-106 03   TF2   CAC    18075   PIWINSKI  SC-216

358:213 Majors Topics and Authors in American Literature

01  TTH5   CAC  05391   LAWRENCE  CI-212 In this course, we will survey a range of works of American fiction from the late nineteenth century to the present. In addition to reading novels and short stories, we will examine manifestos and critical texts from major literary movements in the United States. Authors studied may include Stephen Crane, Charles Chesnutt, Edith Wharton, Ernest Hemingway, Zora Neale Hurston, William Faulkner, Ray Bradbury, James Baldwin, Octavia Butler, Thomas Pynchon, Maxine Hong...

358:215 Introduction to 21st Century Literatures

01   MW4   CAC   17736    MILLER, R.    CA-A4 The spread of broadband access has certainly changed how stories are distributed and how we can respond to them. The rise of gaming as the primary adolescent leisure activity has certainly changed the relationship between reader/gamer and the author/game design team. And contemporary politicians are now making use of these changes to convert facts into fiction and fiction into facts, grinding all developments down into one simple-minded story, where unfounded...

358:242 Introduction to the Novel

01  TTH5    CAC   05393  SPELLMEYER  HH-A4 Modern novels are society thinking out loud—and also in intimate privacy. They arrived on the scene about four centuries ago with a rising middle class that aspired to create a better world. Older literary forms simply couldn’t compete: novels created a mass audience bigger than anything seen in the past because they were a new kind of “technology”: readers could now visualize in their minds different routes to happiness, love, success, friendship, and even...

358:246 Introduction to the Gothic

01  MTH3    CAC  05394   JACKSON  FH-B1 The Psychology and Aesthetics of Fear We read gothic literature for pleasure, for the thrill it gives us, for the spine-tingling suspense that builds to a sudden—often deeply—unsettling crescendo. No sooner do we recover from one fright, but we feel the narrative tension mounting again. Aside from this pleasure, what is gothic literature about? Why the focus on fear, anxiety, and the helplessness of a protagonist? What is our draw to the idea of dark foreboding...

358:253 Introduction to Crime Fiction

01   MTH2   CAC   05395   GOLDSTONE   FH-B1 This course introduces the study of mysteries and detective stories. Crime fiction has been the most popular of all fiction genres for at least the last century, while never fully attaining the honorific status of literature. To study crime fiction is thus not only to study how writers have imagined justice and the law, violence and social order, but also to study the shifting boundaries between what is supposedly mere entertainment and what is supposedly...

358:262 Lit and the Environment: Feminism in a Time of Environmental Crisis

02  MW4    CAC    05398   LUCIANO   HH-A2 What is the relationship between environmental degradation and gender inequality? This class will explore the importance of intersectional feminist thought and practice in combatting climate change and other global environmental crises. We will examine connections between the exploitation of the natural world and the subjugation of human populations, focusing on the links between colonialism, racial capitalism, and the climate. Particular attention will be paid to the...

358:262 Literature and the Environment

01  TTH4   CAC   05397   SPELLMEYER   FH-B1 Every day we hear the same old thing about the urgent need to “save the planet,” yet absolutely nothing seems to change.   As we will see, however, that’s just not true.  Even as you read these words, writers, artists, and philosophers around the world are hard at work alongside scientists creating a new life-affirming civilization.  And as we will also learn, this movement is building on ideas developed right here in the United States.   Starting with David...

359:201 Principles of Literary Study

 01  MTH1   05424 DELORME  SC-204  02 MTH3    05425  GOLDSTONE  FH-A4 05 MTH3   05428 MATHES  SC-120  06 TTH4    05429  OWENS  CA-A3 07 MTH2   05430 SCANLON  HH-A7  08 MW5    05431  OMIROVA  SC-220 09 MW4   05432 BARRIENTOS  SC-203  10 TTH5    05433  ANDERSON  SC-215 11 MW6   05434 DIEHL  HH-B5  12 TTH4    05435  SANDERS HH-A6 13 TTH5   05436 SANCHEZ-ZWEIG  FH-A4  15 TTH7    05438  MUCKLE  CI-201 90   ASYNCHRONOUS 05439 KING    91    ASYNCHRONOUS  05440  IANNINI   92   ASYNCHRONOUS 17737 KING   This course provides an introduction to principal methods and...

African American Literature

358:371 Black Poetry

01   MW7  CAC   05409   SHOCKLEY   FH-B6     Ecopoetics, Antiblackness, & the World as We Know It Cultural geographer Carolyn Finney has said, “If you’re breathing, you’re in ‘nature.’” The last words of Eric Garner and George Floyd, both of whom died at the hands of the police, were, “I can’t breathe.” In this course, we will read broadly and deeply in the tradition of African American poetry, examining how Black poets in the U.S. have imagined the relationship between Blackness and the “natural world.” Our...

358:376 Harlem Renaissance

01  TTH6    CAC   05410   OWENS   CI-201 How did writers “invent” Harlem as a space of possibility, creativity, and challenge? The Harlem Renaissance holds a privileged place in the American imagination. Emerging at a pivotal moment in U.S. history, the literature of Harlem raises questions about citizenship, community, and the very definition of art and politics. We will read works in the context of major historical events shaping the 1920 and 1930s, including the Great Migration and the resulting...

358:381 The Art of Talk Back and Make Space

01  TF1  CAC  05412   SCOTT  CA-A4 The Art of Talk Back and Make Space Black women authors have a long tradition of making the personal political. Black women have historically expressed this in groundbreaking works across multiple and diverse genres. This course will examine how Black women authors use their work to “talk back.” As a class, we will question: Who are they talking to? For whom are they talking? And how does their rhetorical practice claim space in a society that marginalizes them?...

358:381 Towards a Global Conception of Blackness: Music, Movements, and Literature

01   TTH4      CAC   05411  PETERSON    CA-A4 Towards a Global Conception of Blackness: Music, Movements and Literature Scholars continue to ask for a more nuanced and global reading of Blackness. This course surveys the socio-historical and philosophical underpinnings of a move towards a global conception of Blackness through literary, musical, and political practice. In the Black literary tradition, music and language merge as a mechanism for writing singing books. These books can be utilized to both...

358:445 Seminar: Black (In) Translation

01  TTH4        ROBOLIN   SPR - 403 Black (In) Translation There is a word for “black” in nearly every language, but as scholars and practitioners have shown, translating Blackness—as identity, as lived experience, and as claim to political solidarity—is an incredibly complicated task.  By reading contemporary Black literature and translation theory, we will attend to the ways that Blackness travels or does not—how it means and translates differently—through literary and cultural production and translation...

Film

354:371 Film Melodrama

01  MTH3 04987    FLITTERMAN-LEWIS  MU-301                  FILM SCREENING    M 6,7      MU-301        To some extent, all Hollywood film is melodramatic and for one critic,”the family is Hollywood’s one true subject.” From its beginnings, film melodrama has represented crises in familial relations–whether these be of individual identity, of gender roles and sexuality, or of family harmony challenged by external forces. Melodrama articulates problems of passion, desire and emotional excess in a form that has come to be understood as...

354:391 History and Memory in Cinema: France in WWII

01  TTH4   04988    FLITTERMAN-LEWIS    MU-301                   FILM SCREENING  TH 6,7        MU-301 In recent years there has been an exciting resurgence of interest in the complex and disturbing period in France known as the “dark years” of World War II.  This course will look at daily life, especially that of women and children, through the prism of the cinema, using popular films of the time and those more current films that “return to the scene” to explore issues of memory, identity, trauma, and history.  We will look first at...

Literatures of the Global South

358:338 Colonial Literature of Africa

01  TTH6   CAC   00364    IBIRONKE  LSH-B112   Colonial Literature of Africa The colonial literature of Africa consists of literary, non-literary, and oral literature. We begin with Lord Lugard's Dual Mandate and the whole idea of the dark continent. Through the concept of "contact zone" by Mary Louise Pratt, this course examines classical texts by colonial literary writers informed by European travels and explorations, namely, Graham Green's Heart of the Matter and Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness. We will...

358:361 Twentieth Century Global Literature

01  TH1   CAC  05407   MANGHARAM   FH-A2 Thinking Beyond the Human The twentieth (and twenty first centuries) have been characterized by dehumanizing events, including the upheavals of racial segregation and apartheid, colonialism, decolonization, terrorism, and human rights abuses. It is not surprising, then, that one of the central philosophical concerns of our time has been an interrogation of what it means to be 'human,' through bodies of knowledge broadly referred to as 'humanisms,' which have...

358:387 Ethnic Literature in the U.S.

MTH1    CAC    05414   SOSA CABANAS  MU-111 Afro-Cuban Culture: Race and Racism in Literature and Visual Arts: This course examines Afro-Cuban relationships in literature, art, and film. It focusses on the country’s cultural history, with emphasis on ethnological, literary, and artistic perspectives. Discussion topics include different approaches to slavery, emergence of Afro-Cuban culture, racial relations, and the black culture’s representative incorporations into the elite narratives. This course will be...

358:388 Native American Literatures in English

01   MW4  03473   C/D SWEET   RAB-018 This course examines a range of literature and texts that provide a window into Native American cultures, histories, and worldviews. Spanning oral histories of creation stories to autobiographical writing in the twenty-first century, this course will analyze the diversity of Native American literature and its evolving relationship to Native American culture and identity. Students will engage with Native American philosophical, cultural, religious, and historical ideas...

358:389 Asian American Literatures in English

01  TTH5  CAC     03476     ISAAC  HH-A2 This course same as 050:377:01 Violence and Asian American Literature Violence has the ability both to destroy but also to recreate identities and subjects, both to tear away from and to stake claims to nations and places. How and why is violence a recurring theme in Asian American literature? From the Philippine-American War (1898) and the Pacific wars against Japan (1941), Korea (1950s) to the Vietnam War (1960s) and the War on Terror (2001) in the past century,...

358:445 Seminar: Black (In) Translation

01  TTH4        ROBOLIN   SPR - 403 Black (In) Translation There is a word for “black” in nearly every language, but as scholars and practitioners have shown, translating Blackness—as identity, as lived experience, and as claim to political solidarity—is an incredibly complicated task.  By reading contemporary Black literature and translation theory, we will attend to the ways that Blackness travels or does not—how it means and translates differently—through literary and cultural production and translation...

359:312 Colonialism, Capitalism and Decolonization

01   MTH3  CAC   05442   MANGHARAM   FH-B3   Colonialism, Capitalism and Decolonization This course will provide a critical survey of some of the major issues in contemporary literary and cultural theory through the lens of capitalism and colonialism. We will ask: How did the inception of capitalist systems in the colonies change ways of living and working? What were the forms of resistance against colonial and capitalist control? Are new forms of imperialism replacing colonization and how? Is true...

Medieval

358:305 Medieval Romance

01   MW4   CAC   05400  SCANLON   FH-B4 Romance was medieval culture’s most popular non-religious literary genre.  It is probably also the medieval genre which has had the largest influence on subsequent history.  There is almost no form of modern popular narrative, from the Western to science fiction to the soap opera, which does not draw in some way on the conventions of medieval romance.  The most famous medieval romances are those of Arthur.  This course will examine the Arthurian legends in some...

358:308 Cultures of the Middle Ages

01  MTH2  CAC  03358  SERRANO  AB-4052 This course same as 195:388:01  and 667:388:01 From the Muslim invasion of Spain in 711 until the overthrow of the last Muslim ruler and expulsion of the Jews by Christian rulers in 1492 (and the definitive expulsion of the Muslims in 1614), the Iberian Peninsula was a crucible of intercultural invention, transmission and exchange. We will explore the music, architecture and literature of this world, known as al-Andalus to the Muslims and Sepharad to the Jews,...

Nineteenth Century

358:330 Early Romantic Literature

01  T3,4  CAC  05404    YOUSEF  SC-202 Amid revolutions, political unrest, and rapid industrial and economic change, the Romantic era was a time of tumult and change.  New ideas about the nature of the self, about human rights, the nature of community, as well as a distinctly modern concept of the imagination arise in response to the challenges of this pivotal historical moment. This course will examine the richly varied forms of literature and aesthetic innovation that characterize this period and...

358:338 Colonial Literature of Africa

01  TTH6   CAC   00364    IBIRONKE  LSH-B112   Colonial Literature of Africa The colonial literature of Africa consists of literary, non-literary, and oral literature. We begin with Lord Lugard's Dual Mandate and the whole idea of the dark continent. Through the concept of "contact zone" by Mary Louise Pratt, this course examines classical texts by colonial literary writers informed by European travels and explorations, namely, Graham Green's Heart of the Matter and Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness. We will...

358:436 Seminar: Nineteenth Century Literature and Culture

01   TTH4   CAC   05419   IANNINI   HC-S126

358:436 Victorian Stories of Mystery and Detection

02  MTH2  CAC  05420   WILLIAMS  MU-003 Victorian Stories of Mystery and Detection  The figure of “the detective” came into prominence in the Victorian period. We will have fun studying this phenomenon, including many of the most important figures – and culminating with Arthur Conan Doyle’s famous figure, Sherlock Holmes. The reading list will begin with Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” and “The Purloined Letter.” We will read two masterpieces of Victorian fiction: Charles Dickens’s Bleak House...

Renaissance

358:315 Shakespeare: The Later Plays

01   TTH6  CAC    05401  FULTON     SC-205 This course provides a survey of Shakespeare’s great plays written during the reign of James I. Attention will be given to Shakespeare’s context, the history of Shakespeare criticism and reception, and especially to film and stage interpretation. Since plays are written to be performed rather than read in silence, we will spend some time in class watching clips of movies and filmed performances. Readings will include Measure for Measure, Othello, Macbeth, King...

358:320 Grief and Gender in Early Modern Literature

01    TTH4     CAC  05402    CARGES    HH-A4    Grief and Gender in Early Modern Literature This course will explore the relationships between grief and literature in the early modern period, with a particular focus on gender, as femininity and mourning intersected in complex ways in seventeenth-century England. Our readings will include poetry and plays from highly canonical writers (Shakespeare's Hamlet and The Winter's Tale, John Milton's Samson Agonistes, John Donne's Holy Sonnets) but we will also read...

Restoration/Eighteenth Century

358:325 Restoration and 18th Century Drama

01     ASYNCHRONOUS    05403    BUCKLEY   

358:435 Seminar: Fiction / Addiction

 01  TTH4   CAC  05417  ZITIN    HH-B4 Fiction/Addiction What can we learn about addiction from its cultural representation (chiefly in novels and memoirs)? Turning the question around, what can we learn about novels and memoirs—about the very idea of fiction—by thinking about the way addiction features in literary texts? In this course we will track the intersecting development of these two phenomena, addiction and the novel, seeking to discover how each might illuminate the other.  Worries about the...

358:435 Seminar: Jane Austen and Her World

 01  MW5   CAC  05418  FESTA   MU-112 Jane Austen and Her World                                      Why are there so many soldiers stationed in the seemingly sleepy provincial towns where the novels of Jane Austen are so often set?  Jane Austen may conjure up images of a circumscribed world of country towns, flowing dresses and decorous manners, but she lived at a moment of immense historical turmoil, marked by famine, political repression, civil tumult at home, and slavery, revolution, and the Napoleonic Wars abroad.  This course will...

Seminars

358:435 Seminar: Fiction / Addiction

 01  TTH4   CAC  05417  ZITIN    HH-B4 Fiction/Addiction What can we learn about addiction from its cultural representation (chiefly in novels and memoirs)? Turning the question around, what can we learn about novels and memoirs—about the very idea of fiction—by thinking about the way addiction features in literary texts? In this course we will track the intersecting development of these two phenomena, addiction and the novel, seeking to discover how each might illuminate the other.  Worries about the...

358:435 Seminar: Jane Austen and Her World

 01  MW5   CAC  05418  FESTA   MU-112 Jane Austen and Her World                                      Why are there so many soldiers stationed in the seemingly sleepy provincial towns where the novels of Jane Austen are so often set?  Jane Austen may conjure up images of a circumscribed world of country towns, flowing dresses and decorous manners, but she lived at a moment of immense historical turmoil, marked by famine, political repression, civil tumult at home, and slavery, revolution, and the Napoleonic Wars abroad.  This course will...

358:436 Seminar: Nineteenth Century Literature and Culture

01   TTH4   CAC   05419   IANNINI   HC-S126

358:436 Victorian Stories of Mystery and Detection

01   MTH2  CAC  05420   WILLIAMS  MU-003 Victorian Stories of Mystery and Detection  The figure of “the detective” came into prominence in the Victorian period. We will have fun studying this phenomenon, including many of the most important figures – and culminating with Arthur Conan Doyle’s famous figure, Sherlock Holmes. The reading list will begin with Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” and “The Purloined Letter.” We will read two masterpieces of Victorian fiction: Charles Dickens’s Bleak...

358:437 Seminar: Twentieth Century Literature and Culture

01   MTH2   CAC   05421   JURECIC  HC-S120 In the mid-to-late twentieth century, there were a remarkable number of women essayists who were not yet recognized as public intellectuals, but who were, in fact, ahead of their time. In 1962, Rachel Carson wrote about climate change in Silent Spring. Susan Sontag wrote about photography and the ethics of regarding others from 1977-2003. Joan Didion redefined the essay between the 1960s and 2000s, analyzing cultural as well as national politics. In the 1980s,...

358:445 Seminar: Black (In) Translation

01  TTH4        ROBOLIN   SPR - 403 Black (In) Translation There is a word for “black” in nearly every language, but as scholars and practitioners have shown, translating Blackness—as identity, as lived experience, and as claim to political solidarity—is an incredibly complicated task.  By reading contemporary Black literature and translation theory, we will attend to the ways that Blackness travels or does not—how it means and translates differently—through literary and cultural production and translation...

Theories and Methods

359:209 Introduction to Health, Medicine and Literature

01  MTH3   CAC   05441   JURECIC   SC-207  In the 21st century, disease appears to belong to the clean, well-lighted place of fact and biology. And yet, illness and medical treatment take place in culture and are complicated by language, history, economics, and politics. Literature about illness and/or medicine often explores the meeting place of science and culture, along with shifting understandings of patient and doctor, health and illness, body and mind. In this course, we’ll discuss how literature about...

359:312 Colonialism, Capitalism and Decolonization

01   MTH3  CAC   05442   MANGHARAM   FH-B3   Colonialism, Capitalism and Decolonization This course will provide a critical survey of some of the major issues in contemporary literary and cultural theory through the lens of capitalism and colonialism. We will ask: How did the inception of capitalist systems in the colonies change ways of living and working? What were the forms of resistance against colonial and capitalist control? Are new forms of imperialism replacing colonization and how? Is true...

359:362 Digital Literary Studies

01  MTH3   CAC   05443   GLISERMAN   FH-B4 This course will examine two or three novels using software to open the texts to a deeper scrutiny than the unaided mind can attain. We will be doing a small-scale data mining project. In particular we will be looking at the semantic webs—word families--that the text weaves. Students will choose the areas that they might wish to examine—for example, one might want to look at how the mind is represented, and thus one examine all the language associated with...

Twentieth Century

358:355 Later Twentieth Century Poetry

01  MW4     CAC  05405  DOTY    HH-A5 By the mid-Fifties, the wild energy of early Modernism had been tamed, and younger American poets began to resist T.S. Eliot’s edict that poetry should he “impersonal.”  We’ll read remarkable poets  -- among them Robert Lowell, Elizabeth Bishop, Frank O’Hara, Allen Ginsberg, Gwendolyn Brooks and Theodore Roethke -- interested in creating versions of themselves on the page, in poems that map private experience but also situate their speakers in the more public terms of gender,...

358:356 Early Twentieth Century Theater and Drama

01   ASYNCHRONOUS ONLINE  05406   BUCKLEY  

358:361 Twentieth Century Global Literature

01  TH1   CAC  05407   MANGHARAM   FH-A2   Thinking Beyond the Human The twentieth (and twenty first centuries) have been characterized by dehumanizing events, including the upheavals of racial segregation and apartheid, colonialism, decolonization, terrorism, and human rights abuses. It is not surprising, then, that one of the central philosophical concerns of our time has been an interrogation of what it means to be 'human,' through bodies of knowledge broadly referred to as 'humanisms,' which have...

358:363 Tolkien’s Fantasy Fiction

01   MTH2   CAC    05408    JACKSON    HH-B6 J. R. R. Tolkien was fond of pointing out that the word “spell” anciently meant narrative. To tell a story was to cast a spell, to hold an audience spellbound. If you have a sense of what Tolkien meant, you might enjoy this course. But join first and foremost because you are a fan of Tolkien, Middle Earth, and its inhabitants, or because you love fantasy fiction. Come for the adventure of the journey—and it is a journey: an epic one. While we will discuss the...

358:437 Seminar: Twentieth Century Literature and Culture

01   MTH2   CAC   05421   JURECIC  HC-S120 In the mid-to-late twentieth century, there were a remarkable number of women essayists who were not yet recognized as public intellectuals, but who were, in fact, ahead of their time. In 1962, Rachel Carson wrote about climate change in Silent Spring. Susan Sontag wrote about photography and the ethics of regarding others from 1977-2003. Joan Didion redefined the essay between the 1960s and 2000s, analyzing cultural as well as national politics. In the 1980s,...
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