Coiro, Ann Baynes

Coiro, Ann Baynes

Milton in the Long Restoration

Published Date: 2016

Ann Baynes Coiro (Editor)
Oxford University Press, 2016

9780198769774 922e5Milton criticism often treats the poet as if he were the last of the Renaissance poets or a visionary prophet who remained misunderstood until he was read by the Romantics. At the same time, literary histories of the period often invoke a "long eighteenth century" that reaches its climax with the French Revolution or the Reform Bill of 1832. What gets overlooked in such accounts is the rich story of Milton's relationship to his contemporaries and early eighteenth-century heirs. The essays in this collection demonstrate that some of Milton's earliest readers were more perceptive than Romantic and twentieth-century interpreters. The translations, editions, and commentaries produced by early eighteenth century men of letters emerge as the seedbed of modern criticism and the term "neoclassical" is itself unmasked as an inadequate characterization of the literary criticism and poetry of the period--a period that could brilliantly define a Miltonic sublime, even as it supported and described all the varieties of parody and domestication found in the mock epic and the novel. These essays, which are written by a team of leading Miltonists and scholars of the Restoration and eighteenth century, cover a range of topics--from Milton's early editors and translators to his first theatrical producers; from Miltonic similes in Pope's Iliad to Miltonic echoes in Austen's Pride and Prejudice; from marriage, to slavery, to republicanism, to the heresy of Arianism. What they share in common is a conviction that the early eighteenth century understood Milton and that the Long Restoration cannot be understood without him.

Rethinking Historicism from Shakespeare to Milton

Published Date: Cambridge University Press, 2012

coiro_2012Reading literary texts in their historical contexts has been the dominant form of interpretation in literary criticism for the past thirty years. This collection of essays reflects on the origins of historicism and its present usefulness as a mode of literary analysis, its limitations, and its future. The volume provides a brief history of the practice from its renaissance origins, offering examples of historicist work that not only demonstrate the continuing vitality of this methodology but also suggest new directions for research. Focusing on the major figures of Shakespeare and Milton, these essays provide important and concise representations of trends in the field. Designed for scholars and students of early modern English literature (1500-1700), the volume will also be of interest to students of literature more generally and to historians.

Robert Herrick's Hesperides and the Epigram Book Tradition

Published Date: 1988

Ann Baynes Coiro
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1988

Robert Herrick's Hesperides and the Epigram Book TraditionBecause Robert Herrick has usually been regarded as a poet of brief, brilliant moments, the 1,130 poems of his Hesperides have never been treated as a coherent volume. Professor Ann Coiro examines Herrick and Hesperides in a new context—that of the epigram book, a genre that invited a variety of interpretations during the Renaissance. She provides a full appreciation of the work's complex unity and illuminates the structure and function of a long-neglected genre.